Dating violence studies

20-Oct-2016 10:57 by 3 Comments

Dating violence studies - Adult web cam stream

Unfortunately, most studies of IPV in the LGBTQ community focus exclusively on adults, and most studies of teen dating violence fail to take into account respondents’ sexual orientation or gender identity.

Resources The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) The CDC’s National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS) is an ongoing, nationally-representative telephone survey that collects detailed information on sexual violence, stalking, and intimate partner violence victimization of adult women and men in the United States.

REACH also provides youth-focused community prevention and education programs through our Peers Against Violenc E (PAVE) program.

PAVE helps youth develop healthy relationships and practice supportive communication skills, engages youth and invested adults as active bystanders in identifying and responding to dating violence, and fosters youth leadership skills.

According to one study, only a third of teens who were in an abusive relationship ever told anyone about the abuse they experienced.

The 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS), a national survey of intimate partner violence and sexual violence, collected reports of lifetime intimate partner violence from a random sample of women and men 18 and older.

Alarmingly, research indicates that only 33% of teens in abusive relationships have reported their experiences to anyone.

Of those teen survivors, 3% of teens in abusive relationships reported the abuse to authority figures and 6% told family members. Studies show that teens experiencing abuse are more likely to smoke or use drugs, take diet pills/laxatives, engage in risky sexual behaviors, and attempt or consider suicide. Teens experiencing abuse are usually silent about their experience; often, teens blame themselves or normalize abusive behaviors as typical.

In other words, we talk about the violence facing our community from those outside it, from those who are openly homophobic and transphobic, but what about the violence happening within our community?

As difficult as it may be to admit, LGBTQ people – including LGBTQ youth – can be and are perpetrators of violence as well as its victims, and too often, that violence occurs in the context of romantic and/or sexual relationships.

The survey collects data on past-year experiences of violence as well as lifetime experiences of violence.

The survey is also supported by the National Institute of Justice and the Department of Defense.

There are specific warning signs that may indicate your teen is in an abusive relationship.